• Misc

    Anubis, God of Embalming

    Anubis was a jackal-headed deity who presided over the embalming process and accompanied dead kings in the afterworld. When kings were being judged by Osiris, Anubis placed their hearts on one side of a scale and a feather (representing Maat) on the other. Anubis is the son of Osiris and Nephthys. Despite being one of the most ancient and “one of the most frequently depicted and mentioned gods” in the Egyptian pantheon, Anubis played almost no role in Egyptian myths. I believe this helmet mask is carved stone or ceramic and several thousand years old. It would have been fit over the head of a mummified corpse and used as a death mask.  I also…

  • Misc

    Masks as contemporary art and sculpture

    Woodcarver Sherilyn Tharp expresses her history of drawing, woodworking and carving experience with this carved mask. Tharp takes a traditional carved form and uses a wide variety of techniques sometimes in unusual and nontraditional ways to articulate her own vision. Her masks are carved from a wide variety of woods and often embellished with scraps and found objects such as nails or thorns.  The hair of a mask might be scrap from some other project such as basket making materials or fabric scraps. Some of the masks are carved from wood collected from tree cutters that save especially beautiful and unusual logs for her. It is not uncommon for fine…

  • Misc

    Q: I found this mask years ago, but always wonder it’s value and it’s authenticity. Sukelly, 1785 A: And well you should. It is from the undiscovered tribal areas of Papua New Guinea. We can tell because metal tools were not used to carve the mask. The large areas of the Sepic River area were only beginning to be discovered by white men in the early days of the 20th century… there were still a few undiscovered tribes in 2000! This artifact is authentic. It was probably hung on the outside of the owners hut or the inside of a meeting house, and represents the spirit of an important ancestor.…

  • Misc

    Red Mystery mask

    Q: Hello, I inherited this mask. I have posted it in an African art group but no one seemed to have any info for me. Kyle, 1779 A: This may not be African. It looks old, used in culture many times, perhaps in different colors and repainted. It appears to be authentic to me, of course, I could be wrong. Please give us you comment.

  • Misc

    Primitive Tribal Masks 101

    Q: I would like to know more about this mask. Is it authentic and if it is, where does it come from? Value? Thanks, Renske, 1768 A: Our nice looking mask is about as primitive as it can get. I have seen authentic carvings like this from Africa, the Himalayans, and the South Pacific. Unfortunately, ours was made to sell to tourist. Just where is anybody’s guess. So forget about buying a motorcycle. The good news is, this down-to-earth wall-sculpture can be enjoyed by all. And maybe one of our viewers will recognize something I missed. C    

  • Misc

    Latest mystery mask

    Q: I just wish to know the origin of this mask. Thank you. Jean, 1766 A: Glad you sent this in. I’ve been seeing similar masks for a few years now. But I can’t find out where they are coming from. Whether it is an authentic artifact, or something made for commerce must be determined by others. African or Asian? Perhaps one of our viewers will have a comment. Please help us. Jean is an exert on Guatemalan masks, and I’m supposed to be the world famous Mask Man!

  • Misc

    Large mask or sculpture

    Q: Just wondering if anyone can tell me about this mask. It probably weighs 45 lbs. Three feet tall by 1.9 wide, 7 inches deep, it’s huge! Gary, 1761 A: The look of your huge “mask” is a little confusing. It could be a sculpture made for a specific reason, or a big mask held by hand. Whether it is an authentic artifact, or something made for commerce must be determined by others. African or Asian? Perhaps one of our viewers will have a comment. All I can say is that it is very decorative and will display well.        

  • Misc

    Dayak mask from Borneo

    This ceremonial mask comes from the Dayak Kenya-Kayan people who live in Borneo, Indonesia. It is carved wood with natural pigment color and is probably from the late 19th century. Previously in a French collection, it has an old tag that reads “Meyer Collection 0084.” How good that provenance is remains to be seen. It is probably of high value. Try to a find Dayak mask that is similar in appearance. If it is a well made reproduction you might be able to get it for an affordable price. There are still opportunities on the internet. A, 1738